Weekly Photo Challenge: Urban

I was very excited to see this week’s photo challenge theme. I consider myself to be an urbanite. I love the traffic, the tall buildings, the noise and the modernity of the cities I’ve visited and lived in. Here are some photos of some of the cities I have been to and adored.

Helix Bridge in Singapore

A narrow street in Kuching, Malaysia

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Seoul as seen from 63 Building

 

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Together

My inlaws standing together at Namsangol Hanok Village in Seoul, South Korea.

Pigs huddled together in a small village in Cambodia.

My expectant wife and our unborn child together.

Kicking it Korean Style in Portland

Moving from Korea didn’t necessarily mean we would have to give up our Korean lifestyle. Most major cities in North America have some of the foods and other things you would have in Seoul. While we were in Portland we managed to dive a little into our Korean side.

There are a couple of places in downtown Portland where you can choose from a variety of food trucks to eat from. One of these trucks offers a bit of Korean fusion food. At Boolkogi Taco, they take the sweet tasting bulgogi beef and put it in, you guessed it..tacos.

They were small, but quite tasty. Two tacos and a soft drink was $6. Not bad for lunch.

Another Korean activity we enjoyed while living in Seoul was karaoke. Karaoke in Seoul consists of renting  a private room for you and your friends. Voicebox in Portland also offers private rooms.

Once in the room, the process is pretty simple.

First, you choose a song from one of the song books.

Next, belt it out for your friends listening satisfaction.

It’s nice to know that moving from Seoul doesn’t mean we have to say goodbye to Korean culture for good. Korean culture can be found in most major cities in North America. It was nice to have experienced some of it in Portland.

The Cupcakes of Cafe Everyday

Nestled inside the trendy, university district of Hyewha-Dong in Seoul, is a great little cafe with the most delicious cupcakes. The cupcakes of Cafe Everyday do not only taste great, but also look like individual pieces of art.

These cupcakes look almost too good to eat, but if you have a sweet tooth you will eat them anyway.

I’m not too sure what the calorie count is on these tasty suckers, but you will lose weight in your wallet or purse though purchasing these treats. The average price is about 4000 WON ($3.50 USD) each.

Though these cupcakes can be a little pricey and maybe a little high in calories, they  are certainly worth a taste. You will admire their creative designs and then devour their deliciousness.

The Ways We Get Around

As you travel the world you get to see many different modes of transportation. Here are some photos taken from different places I’ve visited of the different ways people get around.

A motorcycle/car. (Negombo Beach, Sri Lanka)

Elephant ride. (Sri Lanka)

Kia’s new electric car; Ray. (Bukchon, Seoul)

Boat (Marina Bay Sands Mall, Singapore)

Boat taxi (Kuching, Malaysia)

Triways (Seoul)

Zipline (Boracay, Philippines)

Buggy Car (Boracay, Philippines)

Sailboat (Busan, South Korea)

Junk ship (Ha Long Bay, Vietnam)

Strolling Around Bukchon

The alleys and narrow streets of Bukchon will bring you back in time. It’s a great place to see how Seoulites of the past used to live.

The hanok villages are actually still occupied by some of Seoul’s residents.

The area is quite hilly. You should be prepared for inclines and stairs if you visit.

From this picture you can see how much Seoul has changed over the years. From the traditional roofs to the modern skyline.

Each house has either a wooden gate or a metal one and sometimes both.

Bukchon is always on the lists of places to visit in Seoul. It’s a great glimpse into the past while still seeing how Koreans use this space today.